Twist Pilot Review—Glorious to the Eyes

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Twist Pilot is one of the most radiant games on that PlayStation Vita OLED screen, as the colors just pop out magnificently. That is regardless of whether it’s a Mini, PSOne Classic, PlayStation Mobile game, or native Vita game you’re comparing it to.

At first, I admit, I was not really impressed with this particular game because it did seem like just a Flash-based browser game with touch controls. Well, to be honest, most of these PlayStation Mobile games are just console versions of Flash games. And that is not a bad thing entirely, given that many mobile games, across all ecosystems, be it Android, Windows Phone, or iOS, are like Flash games. And Flash games are not all bad, I just want to lay that down.

Much of the Flash game vibe comes from how the game presents its levels in the menu, anyway. I don’t know how to describe it, but the simplistic (albeit colorful) presentation makes me think that way. In Twist Pilot, you guide a pill named Phil across various levels. I am not entirely sure if it’s a pill, but it does look like one. And it can’t be helped that Phil is colored red; he’s just begging to be assumed to be a pill. Phil is constantly rotating in place, making this action-puzzler fun and more challenging.

The object of the game is to transport Phil from point A to point B, while collecting enough rings to qualify for the three-star level rating. You could theoretically bypass the rings and go right straight to the exits, but it wouldn’t be much fun. Twist Pilot is more concerned with the time you take going to the exits, anyway. There is a regenerating life meter, since your life is damaged by hitting the walls, or the spiders, or the moving platforms, among other things. Also, there is a time penalty every time you collide with the walls or platforms. Basically, the only safe things inside the levels are the empty spaces, rings, and power-ups. The power-ups, more often than not, are actually power-downs, as they are detrimental to completing the stage instead of helping you out. These power-ups include faster rotations, elongation, shrinkage, etc.

This review so far might be giving the impression that Twist Pilot is boring, but it isn’t. It is just that the actual gameplay is simplistic, so that it doesn’t require further explanation. The graphics are great, as I already mentioned. You can skip the sound department, since it’s forgettable. The controls are responsive, so you can’t use them as scapegoats every time you fail. There is an achievement system, but no Trophy support, though. And also, there’s a promise of additional levels coming soon, though I’m not holding my breath on that one.

The level progression is the key to games like these. Twist Pilot is, truthfully, an easy game to finish, “easy” meaning you can finish the stages in one or a few tries max. The stages are short, but they are varied—they aren’t wildly different from each other, but they won’t feel like you’re playing the same levels as before. The hook in the game is that you are compelled to have the shortest time possible, because you can actually feel that, indeed, you can finish the game with the least possible time, because of the fact that it is “easy.” You are not fighting against the game anymore, but rather you are competing against yourself. Skill is indeed needed here.

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Twist Pilot is just that. Plain Jane it may be, but with the current PS Mobile offerings, we can’t really be choosy. Can we?

7.5/10

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Comments

4 Responses to “Twist Pilot Review—Glorious to the Eyes”
  1. onmode-ky says:

    “And it can’t be helped that Phil is colored red; he’s just begging to be assumed to be a pill.”

    I . . . feel like I must be missing an allusion to something else here. At any rate, I think he kind of looks like a weird, centrally eyed variant of a planarian.

    “The hook in the game is that you are compelled to have the shortest time possible, because you can actually feel that, indeed, you can finish the game with the least possible time, because of the fact that it is ‘easy.’”

    I don’t do well with games of this type. In the end, I find myself driven crazy by repeatedly trying to do the perfect speedrun, only to keep making some small mistakes that incur large penalties (like the seconds added to your time in this game). The Edge Mini was like that, too, except that the time penalty was built into the gameplay; if you didn’t time your cube’s movements and stops precisely, the cube would take something like a full second to properly right itself before you could continue onward. I played half of Edge and then quit in exasperation.

  2. JeremyR says:

    There is very famous line from the Matrix about a red pill

    “This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill – the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill – you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.”

    Though from the title screen, he looks more like a hot dog that has somehow escaped from its bun.

  3. onmode-ky says:

    Well, I know the Matrix bit, but Phil here doesn’t look much like Dayquil to me.

  4. JeremyR says:

    Really? He even looks like he’s full of liquid. See how his center is slightly different colored?

    Though you would think it would all run out his mouth…

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